Patty Wellborn

Email: patty-wellborn@news.ok.ubc.ca


 

Canadian filmmaker Min Sook Lee will be visiting UBC Okanagan’s campus next week.

Canadian filmmaker Min Sook Lee will be visiting UBC Okanagan’s campus next week.

Award-winning Canadian filmmaker Min Sook Lee will be visiting UBC Okanagan’s campus next week.

Min Sook, a ground-breaking artist and Canadian filmmaker, will be a visiting scholar—meeting and working with students and professors in the Faculty of Creative and Critical Studies. She has a diverse and prolific portfolio of multimedia work and films and an interdisciplinary background in labour, border politics, documentary film/video, art, and social change.

"Min Sook’s powerful and wide-ranging work in the media arts will appeal to diverse audiences,” says Ruthann Lee, assistant professor of Cultural Studies at UBC’s Okanagan campus. “Her background in social and political justice combines issues of race, labour, sexuality, and gender in unexpected and profound ways.”

“We are absolutely thrilled to have Min Sook share her insights and award-winning film work during her stay as the FCCS Visiting Scholar," adds Lee.

Min Sook is an assistant professor at the Ontario College of Art and Design University where she teaches Art and Social Change.

Min Sook’s documentary The Real Inglorious Bastards (2012) was honoured with the Canadian Screen Award for Best History Documentary in 2013. Her latest documentary, Migrant Dreams (2016), a portrait of migrant workers in Canada, debuted at Hot Docs this spring.

Min Sook will spend a week on campus from February 19 to 25 working with students, faculty and participating in a series of free, public events. For details about upcoming events, contact: Ruthann Lee at ruthann.lee@ubc.ca

When: Monday, February 20, at 6 p.m.
What: Film Screening | Tiger Spirit: A Journey Through Korea's Divided Heart
Who: Min Sook Lee, filmmaker and visiting scholar
Where: Kelowna Forum, 1317 Ethel Street, Kelowna Hosted by the Okanagan Korean Culture and Knowledge Society

What: Research Seminar | Building Resistance Through Art
Who: Min Sook Lee, filmmaker and visiting scholar
When: Tuesday, February 21, 12:30 p.m. 
Where:
ARTS 368, Arts Building, 1147 Research Rd, UBC Okanagan
Starting a Conversation Brown Bag Series Discussion, Hosted by the Institute for Community Engaged Research

When: Wednesday, February 22, at 3:30 p.m.
What: Film Screening | Badge of Pride: Gay Cops Come Out
Who: Min Sook Lee, filmmaker and visiting scholar
Where: University Theatre, Administration Building, ADM 026, UBC Okanagan

When: Friday, February 24, at 6 p.m.
What: Film Screening & Community Forum | Migrant Dreams: Migrant Workers Resist
Who: Min Sook Lee, filmmaker and visiting scholar
Where: Mary Irwin Theatre, 421 Cawston Ave., Kelowna
Hosted by the AlterKnowledge Discussion Series and the Cultural Studies Annual Visiting Speaker Program.

While this event is free, preregistration is required: migrant-dreams.eventbrite.ca

Min Sook's visit is sponsored by UBC's Faculty of Creative and Critical Studies; AlterKnowledge Discussion Series; Cultural Studies Annual Visiting Speaker Program; Equity and Inclusion Office; Institute for Community Engaged Research; Community Culture, and Global Studies; History and Sociology; University of Alberta Press; Okanagan Korean Culture and Knowledge Society; Radical Action with Migrants in Agriculture.

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The Okanagan Research Forum will discuss changes this region is facing due to climate change, population growth, and land use changes.

The Okanagan Research Forum will discuss changes this region is facing due to climate change, population growth, and land use changes.

What: Okanagan Research Forum
Who: UBC Okanagan Institute for Biodiversity, Resilience, and Ecosystem Services (BRAES) and UBC Okanagan Institute for Community Engaged Research (ICER)
When: Monday, December 5 from 9 a.m. to 5 p.m. with keynote lecture 6:30 p.m. to 8 p.m.
Where: Kelowna Yacht Club banquet room, 1370 Water St, Kelowna

The Okanagan Research Forum invites the community to listen to experts and take part in an open discussion about the future of the Okanagan landscape.

Hosted by UBC Okanagan’s BRAES Institute and ICER Institute in collaboration with partner organizations, the forum will be about sharing information and encouraging conversation between members of the community, locally engaged organizations, government and academia. Event partners include the Okanagan Basin Water Board, Okanagan Nation Alliance, BC Wildlife Federation, City of Kelowna (Imagine Kelowna), and the Okanagan Collaborative Conservation Program.

The theme of this year’s event is resilience and will include plenary presentations and discussions by expert panelists to explore how the concept of resilience applies to social, cultural and ecological systems. The afternoon will include a facilitated working session and group discussions.

The evening keynote lecture on community resilience will be presented by Assoc. Prof. Kyle Powys Whyte, indigenous philosopher and activist from Michigan State University.

Both the daytime session and the keynote lecture are open to the public. There is a nominal registration fee for the daytime sessions to cover the cost of food and beverages. The keynote is free.

To register, or get more information visit okresearchforum.geolive.ca or contact Carolina Restrepo at carolina.restrepo@ubc.ca

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Seth Klein speaks in Vernon, October 11.

Seth Klein speaks in Vernon, October 11.

What: Climate Justice in BC: Re-Imagining a Good Green Life
Who: Seth Klein, BC Director for the Canadian Centre for Policy Alternatives
When: Tuesday, October 11, starting at 7 p.m.
Where: Schubert Centre, 3505 30th Ave., Vernon

The hot topics of equality, jobs, and climate justice will be the focus of a special presentation with Seth Klein in Vernon next week.

Klein’s talk, Climate Justice: How BC can be carbon-zero with more equality and thousands of good jobs, will share key findings and policy solutions produced by the Canadian Centre for Policy Alternative’s Climate Justice Project.

Klein is the BC director for the Canadian Centre for Policy Alternatives (CCPA). Much of his research deals primarily with welfare policy, poverty, inequality and economic security.

His talk is free and open to the public and is co-sponsored by UBC Okanagan, the Sustainable Environment Network Society, the Canadian Federation of University Women and the North Okanagan Shuswap Green Party.

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What: Annual Gathering of the BC Food Systems Network
Who: Farmers, ranchers, fishers, First Nations and community members who produce food
When: Friday, July 15, starting at 9 a.m. to Sunday, July 17
Where: En'owkin Centre, Lot 45 Green Mountain Road, Penticton, BC

Institute for Community Engaged Research (ICER) logoThe BC Food Systems Network (BCFSN) works to create healthy, just and sustainable food systems in British Columbia by strengthening connections, nurturing capacity, and supporting food policy at all levels.

BCFSN works with farmers and ranchers, fishers, First Nations, and people in communities working to rebuild their food systems from the ground up. This year, the three-day event will focus on Reconciling Cultures and Re-connecting Foodscapes.

The event is an opportunity for various cultures to come together with the Syilx and other Indigenous people to explore what it means to truly reconcile with the first peoples of the land and water and reconnect with and honour the lands and waters that are vital to food systems and community wellbeing.

This event is hosted by UBC’s Institute for Community Engaged Research, the BC Food Systems Network, the En’owkin Centre, and the Penticton Indian Band.

For more information or to register, visit: eventbrite.ca/e/bcfsn-annual-gathering-july-15-17-2016-tickets-19364150696

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Time with his dying father leads to new book, and profound new quality of life

Award-winning musician, journalist, and writer Wab Kinew will talk about his new book The Reason You Walk when he visits Kelowna September 30. Kinew is the next speaker in UBC Okanagan’s Distinguished Speaker Series. Photo courtesy of: Katelyn Malo

Award-winning musician, journalist, and writer Wab Kinew will talk about his new book The Reason You Walk when he visits Kelowna September 30. Kinew is the next speaker in UBC Okanagan’s Distinguished Speaker Series. Photo courtesy of: Katelyn Malo

What: Distinguished Speaker Series: The Reason You Walk
Who: Wab Kinew, Canadian journalist, author, hip-hop musician
When: Wednesday, September 30 at 7 p.m.
Where: Kelowna Community Theatre, 1375 Water St., Kelowna 

A celebrated journalist, writer, musician, and hip-hop artist Wab Kinew knows what it’s like to be at a major crossroads in life. Growing up, initially on a reserve in northern Ontario and then in the inner city of Winnipeg, Kinew could have become a victim of circumstance and his family’s history. His father was raised in a residential school; stories of abuse, rape, alcoholism, and brutality were the constant shadows of his family’s background.

Kinew’s path could have taken any direction. He made mistakes. But he also asked questions. And he expected changes. When those didn’t come, he made his own changes and began speaking out about why Aboriginal people are treated differently than non-Aboriginals.

Already successful in his career, Kinew decided to spend time reconnecting with his dad shortly after his father was diagnosed with cancer. His book, The Reason You Walk, is the result of that time together and the conversations and healing that took place. This chapter in his life will be the main topic of Kinew’s talk when he visits Kelowna as part of UBC Okanagan’s Distinguished Speaker Series September 30.

Talented, passionate and smart, Kinew — who has a degree in economics — has become an accomplished journalist and a motivational speaker. He helped produce and host the acclaimed CBC series 8th Fire, has hosted Canada Reads, is an Aljazeera America correspondent, and at the same time is the Associate Vice-President of Indigenous Affairs at the University of Winnipeg. His hip hop music has won an Aboriginal People’s Choice Music Award, his journalism has won accolades, and he’s been nominated for a Gemini. Postmedia News has called him one of “nine Aboriginal movers and shakers you should know.”

Kinew will speak at the Kelowna Community Theatre, 1375 Water Street on Wednesday, September 30 at 7 p.m. His visit is part of the UBC Okanagan’s Distinguished Speaker Series which is presented by the Irving K. Barber School of Arts and Sciences. This event is free and open to the public, but pre-registration is required.

To register, visit: www.speakers.ok.ubc.ca

The Reason You Walk will be published this fall and UBC’s Bookstore plans to provide the book for sale at the event.

The Distinguished Speaker Series brings to the Okanagan compelling speakers, with unique perspectives on issues that affect our region, our country and our world. The theme of the series is A Civil and Sustainable Society.

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Minds and Music: Octagon

Eight eminent artists perform works by Beethoven and Schubert at free event

What: Minds and Music
Who: Octagon classical musical ensemble
When: Friday, March 27, 12:30 to 1:50 p.m.
Where: University Centre Ballroom, UBC’s Okanagan campus, Kelowna

Take eight passionate and talented musicians; combine them with UBC Okanagan’s annual Minds and Music event, and you end up with an extraordinary Friday afternoon performance.

The illustrious ensemble Octagon performs at UBC Okanagan’s Minds and Music event on Friday, March 27 in the University Centre Ballroom.

The public is invited to join Octagon musicians Martin Beaver, Mark Fewer, Rivka Golani, Rachel Mercer, Joseph Phillips, James Campbell, Kathleen McLean, and Ken MacDonald as they perform a selection of seldom-heard but popular pieces. The afternoon will include excerpts from Schubert’s Octet Opus 16 and Beethoven’s Septet Opus 20, one of his most successful and popular works.

Minds and Music is organized by Irving K. Barber School of Arts and Sciences Assoc. Prof. of Philosophy Manuela Ungureanu. She envisions students, faculty, staff, and the wider Okanagan community together experiencing the joy of music making and learning about its cultural and historical ties.

“In making this concept a reality,” says Ungureanu, “we have enriched life at UBC's Okanagan campus. We have also been surprised to discover a real appetite in the community for bringing the universal language of music into our everyday conversations, with music performances enhanced by faculty presentations, some of which are connected to our regular courses in the humanities.”

This time the Minds and Music event coincides with a first-year course, Introduction to Literary Genre, taught by Assist. Prof. Anderson Araujo, who teaches English with the department of Critical Studies. Araujo recently taught Romantic poetry and sees the concert as a unique opportunity to enhance literary study with music from the time period.

“It is not only a rare privilege to be able to attend a first-rate performance of selections by Romantic composers on our campus,” Araujo says. “But it will also give the students a richer understanding of the Romantic Revolution in the arts.”

The Octagon concert is open to the public and takes place in the University Centre Ballroom (UNC 200). This free event is supported by Chamber Music Kelowna and the Irving K. Barber School of Arts and Sciences (Unit 8).

To find out more, visit: mindsandmusic.ok.ubc.ca/2015/octagon

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Award-winning writer and broadcaster Jay Ingram is UBC Okanagan’s next distinguished speaker. He will discuss the science of Alzheimer’s on Wednesday, February 25 at the Kelowna Community Theatre.

Award-winning writer and broadcaster Jay Ingram is UBC Okanagan’s next distinguished speaker. He will discuss the science of Alzheimer’s on Wednesday, February 25 at the Kelowna Community Theatre.

High demand in community for Alzheimer’s speaker

UBC Okanagan has added a second evening to its Distinguished Speaker Series presentation by Jay Ingram.

The iconic Canadian writer and broadcaster will speak about his new book The End of Memory: A Natural history of Alzheimer’s disease on Thursday, February 26 at the Mary Irwin Theatre. The talk, free and open to the public, will be his second presentation on the topic, as his first presentation the previous evening is fully booked.

This is the first time a Distinguished Speaker Series presentation has been extended to a two-night engagement.

"It's not surprising there is a thirst for knowledge about Alzheimer's disease,” says Ingram. “It's now the subject of plays and novels, but it is also important to understand the history of the disease and the science.”

In his latest book, The End of Memory, Ingram explores the mystery of Alzheimer’s and how it attacks the brain. Alzheimer’s is a growing concern as more and more people are being diagnosed with the disease as populations are living longer.

Ingram, the former host of popular science shows such as CBC’s Quirks and Quarks and Discovery Channel Canada’s Daily Planet, will speak about the mystery of Alzheimer’s and the desperate need for more research funding.

The Science of Alzheimer’s Distinguished Speaker event is presented by UBC Okanagan’s Irving K. Barber School of Arts and Sciences, and takes place Thursday, February 26, at the Mary Irwin Theatre, 421 Cawston Avenue, Kelowna. The event is free and begins at 7 p.m.

Registration is required: dss-ingram-night2.eventbrite.ca

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Award-winning writer and broadcaster Jay Ingram is UBC Okanagan’s next distinguished speaker. He will discuss the science of Alzheimer’s on Wednesday, February 25 at the Kelowna Community Theatre.

Award-winning writer and broadcaster Jay Ingram is UBC Okanagan’s next distinguished speaker. He will discuss the science of Alzheimer’s on Wednesday, February 25 at the Kelowna Community Theatre.

UBC Okanagan’s Distinguished Speaker Series tackles mystery of the tragic illness

Jay Ingram describes Alzheimer’s as a wicked disease that society has ignored for too long. While much research has been done on memory loss, the cruelty of Alzheimer’s is the tragic effect it has on the life of the patient, and how it devastates those left to care for a person who no longer knows who they are.

In his latest book, The End of Memory, the award-winning science author explores the mystery of Alzheimer’s and how it attacks the brain. And he raises valid questions: where did it come from? Why weren’t we talking about it 50 years ago? Do we understand what is really going on in a patient’s afflicted brain?

German neurologist Alois Alzheimer first diagnosed the disease in 1906. While it’s been recognized for decades, Ingram argues research money set aside for Alzheimer’s still trails far behind funding for other deadly illnesses such as cancer and lung disease. And as society continues to live longer than previous generations, more and more people will be diagnosed and begin the long, lonely demise of Alzheimer’s.

Ingram says it’s time for a rethink on how we deal with Alzheimer’s. Being informed, he says, is a good thing and his goal with his new book is to help people understand the disease. Ingram will unravel some of the mystery of Alzheimer’s at UBC Okanagan’s Distinguished Speaker Series in Kelowna on Wednesday, February 25.

Ingram is an iconic Canadian writer and broadcaster, hosting several shows including CBC’s Quirks and Quarks and Discovery Channel Canada’s Daily Planet. His book The End of Memory: A Natural history of Alzheimer’s disease will be available for sale and signing at the Distinguished Speaker Series event.

The Science of Alzheimer’s is presented by UBC Okanagan’s Irving K. Barber School of Arts and Sciences, and takes place at the Kelowna Community Theatre, 1375 Water St. The event is free and begins at 7 p.m.

Registration is required: dss-ingram.eventbrite.ca

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Award-winning photographer Edward Burtynsky collects images from an oilfield. His October 22 presentation, Landscape of Human Systems, is part of UBC Okanagan’s Distinguished Speaker Series.  (Photo credit: Noah Weinzweig)

Award-winning photographer Edward Burtynsky collects images from an oilfield. His October 22 presentation, Landscape of Human Systems, is part of UBC Okanagan’s Distinguished Speaker Series.
(Photo credit: Noah Weinzweig)

Award-winning artist is UBC Okanagan’s next distinguished speaker

World-renowned photographer Edward Burtynsky is returning to UBC Okanagan.

Burtynsky, who was presented with an honorary doctoral degree from UBC Okanagan in June 2013, is the first guest of this year’s Distinguished Speaker Series. In his Landscape of Human Systems presentation, Burtynsky presents a collection of his work, including large-scale colour photographs and recent film footage. While his large photographs will be displayed behind him, he will discuss the technique behind his image-making as he explores society’s troubling relationship with nature.

Born in St. Catharine’s, Ontario, a town dependent on auto assembly plants, he grew up in a heavily industrial yet picturesque part of the country. He started taking pictures at age 11, shortly after his father purchased a used camera and some darkroom equipment. He earned his degree in photography from Ryerson University, and studied graphic art at Niagara College.

Burtynsky’s imagery explores the link between industry and nature, and the damage society has done to the planet through mining, quarrying, manufacturing, shipping, and oil production. His remarkable large-format photographic depictions of global industrial landscapes are included in the collections of more than 50 major museums around the world, including the National Gallery of Canada, the Bibliothèque Nationale in Paris, the Museum of Modern Art, and the Guggenheim Museum in New York.

In 2006, Burtynsky became an Officer of the Order of Canada. His other distinctions include the TED Prize, the Outreach award at the Rencontres d’Arles, the Roloff Beny Book award, the Rogers Best Canadian Film Award, and the Award in Contemporary Art from Toronto’s Museum of Contemporary Canadian Art.

Burtynsky’s The Landscape of Human Systems takes place at the Kelowna Community Theatre, 1375 Water St, on Wednesday, October 22, at 7 p.m. His visit is presented by the Irving K. Barber School of Arts and Sciences, in collaboration with the Faculty of Creative and Critical Studies, as part of UBC's Distinguished Speaker Series.

This event is free and open to the public, but pre-registration is required. To register, visit: speakers.ok.ubc.ca/2014/burtynsky

Edward Burtynsky has spent decades photographing modern society's troubling relationship with nature. His Landscape of Human Systems presentation on October 22 is a combination of new photographs and film production that document his findings.

Edward Burtynsky has spent decades photographing modern society's troubling relationship with nature. His Landscape of Human Systems presentation on October 22 is a combination of new photographs and film production that document his findings.

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Ian Parker

Canadian pianist Ian Parker has performances in Kelowna on Monday, February 3 and Tuesday, February 4.

Vancouver-born pianist provides an interactive Q and A session at Kelowna events

What: Interactive classical music event
Who: Ian Parker, world-renowned pianist and teacher
When: Monday, February 3, 7 p.m.
Where: Rotary Centre for the Arts' Mary Irwin Theatre, 421 Cawston Ave., Kelowna, BC
When: Tuesday, February 4, 12:30 p.m.
Where: University Centre ballroom, 3272 University Way, UBC’s Okanagan campus, Kelowna
Admission: Tickets for the Monday show are $17.50, available through the Rotary Centre box office.

One of Canada’s favorite, and most engaging pianists, Ian Parker, is hosting two events where he will perform a number of classical music arrangements, and then open the floor for questions from the audience.

Parker, born in Vancouver to a musical family, has been playing piano since he was a toddler and has earned bachelor and Master of Music degrees from The Juilliard School. While at Juilliard, the Canada Council for the Arts awarded him the Sylva Gelber Career Grant, which is given annually to the most talented Canadian artist. His career has since skyrocketed and he now plays to international audiences around the world.

The engaging musician will be in Kelowna the first week of February for two performances. His first event, Fantasies of High (-tech) Culture and…the Piano, takes place on Monday, February 3 at the Rotary Centre for the Arts' Mary Irwin Theatre. At this event, Parker will perform Beethoven's Sonata quasi una Fantasia op.27 no.1, Liszt's Sonata in B minor, Ravel's Ondine and his own transcription for the piano of Gershwin's Rhapsody in Blue.

Tickets for the Monday show are $17.50 each and available through the Rotary Centre box office.

On Tuesday, February 4, at 12:30 p.m. Parker will present a similar performance called High (-tech) Culture, Philosophy and…the Piano at UBC’s Okanagan campus University Centre ballroom.

At this event, the pianist will perform Beethoven's Sonata quasi una Fantasia op.27 no.2 -- Moonlight, Schubert /Liszt Auf dem Wasser zu singen, Ravel’s Ondine, and Gershwin/Parker Rhapsody in Blue. While this event is free and open to the public, pay parking is in effect, and donations will be accepted at the door.

Both performances include an interactive period where he will answer questions. At the UBC event, professors David Boutillier and Manuela Ungureanu, and their students will facilitate the questions. The public is encouraged to email questions concerning Parker’s selected repertoire ahead of time and he will answer as many as time permits. To submit a question to either show, please send them in advance to manuela.ungureanu@ubc.ca with the subject line: QUESTION FOR IAN.

Parker’s appearance at UBC’s Okanagan campus is part of the Minds and Music concert series which is made possible through the Irving K. Barber Endowment fund.

More information about Parker’s visit to UBC can be found at: www.ubc.ca/okanagan/mindsandmusic/2014/parker

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